Mr Bullet

While I had a penchant for Batman growing up, truth be told, I was far more obsessed with James Bond as a kid. While Goldeneye was probably my gateway drug to the world lovingly crafted by Ian Fleming and Albert R. Broccoli, I found my favourite of the Bond films to sit with Roger Moore. There was something about ‘Live and Let Die’ which tickled every single part of my musical, cinematic and thematic Venn diagram overlap and if I’m perfectly honest, I’m not entirely convinced that any other Bond movie – including the Daniel Craig films which I absolutely love – has come even close.

Mr Bullet achieves absolutely none of this romanticised life-of-a-spy world. I just wanted to talk about James Bond. Instead, Mr Bullet is about one thing, and one thing only – it just wants you to shoot stuff.

The first levels take you through a range of what are essentially tutorial levels, with a range of different scenarios for you to base your shots around. At first, it’s just about aiming, and then it becomes about aiming at objects to cause a secondary kill, and lastly, it becomes about the speed of your shot.

I made it into the early stages of Part 2 in the game, which switches up the enemies for what, I assume, are Ninjas, and by this stage you have a fairly good grasp of what you need to do to finish a level. Most of the time, you just wait to see the satisfying pass of a bullet through an enemy head, creating a little hole as it does so.

Where this game really frustrates me – and it will be the case for many free-to-play games, is the forced advertisements at seemingly ad hoc periods throughout the game. Finish a level? Sure, here, have an ad. Wait three more levels, and then every level after that has another ad. It is an interesting design choice to let you work your way pretty much through Stage 1 uninhibited, and then start to slam you once you hit the Ninjas, but I suspect smarter marketers with more qualitative data have determined that this particular approach earns the most clicks.

Switching up where the Exit (X) button is on an ad doesn’t hurt either though, does it, Don Draper?

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